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800.ELLIMAN

4.5 out of 10

Stuyvesant Town

Ranked 36th best neighborhood in Manhattan
40.7321114768205 -73.9755690021709
Great for
  • Parks & Recreation
  • Gym & Fitness
  • Clean & Green
  • Neighborly Spirit
  • Peace & Quiet
Not great for
  • Shopping Options
  • Parking
  • Nightlife
  • Eating Out
  • Resale or Rental Value
Who lives here?
  • Tourists
  • Beach Lovers
  •  
  •  
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Reviews

sg sg
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
Jun 24, 2018

"Noisy dogs and NYU partyers!"

Dogs walk people wherever they want to go and leave gifts. There is a loud vocal choir from dogs at all hours day & night. And the NYU students also howl at the moon anytime they please. No security unless you call and then can take 15-30 minutes, Thus closed windows 24/7 in fall and winter and a/c Spring & summer. Brown water on occasion - make sure you have a friend or gym nearby! Workers in golf carts have missed me twice on sidewalks. washer/dryers? go to a laundry! Management is uninterested though the lip service is A+.
Pros
  • Nice neighbors; until they get fed up and move
  • Good transport connections
Cons
  • NOISY!
  • Smelly dog urine & poop / fertilizer used is nasty!
  • No parking or security seen on premise
  • Scary at night
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
2yrs+

"Boring, Quiet Neighborhood In A Corner By The Highway"

Every city has a Stuy Town. It's that urban residential area that isn't in proximity to anything important and is nothing but generic apartment complexes jammed under a freeway.

The best part about Stuy Town is leaving Stuy Town, in that it is fairly close to the more exciting parts of lower Manhattan. The apartments are affordable and decent on the inside and you have access to all the basics. It's a quiet area without much happening so if that's you thing, and you're not high on aesthetics (or at least it is not as high on your list as a decent rent) it's a decent place to live.

There are no tourist attractions which is fine because it isn't that easy to get to by train. There is certainly nothing to see here.

At the end of the day, Stuyvesant Town offers nothing more than a place to hang your hat at night and the ability to live in the city within proximity to the better aspects of Lower Manhattan. The rents are okay, the area is mostly quiet. At the same time, there aren't many places to grab some food or a drink and not much entertainment or nightlife to be found anywhere. You're right by East Village though which means not having to go very far to get those things.
Pros
  • quiet
  • secluded from the city noise
Cons
  • ugly
  • While close to more interesting neighborhoods, nothing to do here
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
2yrs+

"Newly pricey private residential area"

Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village jointly make a private residential area on the lower east side of Manhattan. This is quite a historical area, especially with regard to the early days of New York City when the Dutch settled. (Peter Cooper founded Cooper Union where Abraham Lincoln gave a key speech.) The development runs from East 14th to East 23rd Streets and is far on the eastern part of Manhattan from First Avenue to Avenue C in Alphabet City. Stuyvesant Square and Stuyvesant High School are very well-known, and Beth Israel Medical Center is in this area.

They started constructing the current apartment buildings in the 1940s, and they were reasonably priced in the past. There are some larger apartments here, but they're decidedly pricey now thanks to a recent sale of the real estate. One-bedroom units go for about $3,000 and up a month. There's controversy here, too. Lawsuits have been filed because the new landlord is trying to charge higher rents of the current tenants.

Personally, I'm not all that fond of this area and wouldn't want to live here, especially since the controversy really rubs me the wrong way. And now that the rents have become so high, I couldn't consider it if I wanted to.
Cons
  • once affordable apartments made into luxury condos
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
2yrs+

"Desolate Place to Be"

If you want to visit a place that has just condos and expensive apartment buildings, you've come to the right place. Stuyvesant Town is not what people may think it to be. There really is not much going on there except for people going in and coming out of their places.

There are better places to live and visit. If you want beauty, try Central Park.
Pros
  • spacious apartments
  • quiet
  • Good transport connections
  • secluded from the city noise
  • Conveniences are close
Cons
  • really ugly
  • Scary at night
  • ugly
  • While close to more interesting neighborhoods, nothing to do here
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
2yrs+

"Desolate residential area, not much else"

When Tishman Speyer took control of the Stuyvesant Town properties a few years ago, they made a big deal in the press about how they were going to spend millions of dollars on planting new trees and flowers all over the complex. This was a way of underscoring the failed attempt to turn Stuy Town's affordable housing units into luxury condos, a plan that went seriously wrong recently with the purchasers defaulting on their billion-dollar loans. Anyways, how they went about beautifying the complex was by ordering trees and flowers to be delivered and then leaving them above ground for weeks to die. Many of the plants ended up in the compost heap, or died soon after planting, and now that the money for this kind of beautification project has dried up, Stuy Town is as ugly and depressing as it ever was. The 80-acre park is a world unto itself, with apartments that are reportedly very spacious but very poorly maintained. This brick enclave is situated in the middle of Manhattan, and surrounded by neighborhoods that are so much more attractive and interesting, like Gramercy Park, the Flatiron District, and Union Square. The only real advantage to living in the complex is proximity, but otherwise it's hard to see how this desolate area would have become a land of luxury condos.
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
2yrs+

"Looks like the projects, costs like a luxury condo"

I don't really get Stuy Town or why these big, ugly impersonal city blocks would be an attractive place to buy a luxury condo. But apparently not everyone agrees with me, for this former low income housing community was bought by Met Life in 2000, with the intention of renovating the rental units for the luxury market and jacking up rent prices accordingly. This plan turned out to be a spectacular failure, as the original tenants resisted eviction, and the plan of converting apartments didn't go quickly enough to pay off the creditors on the purchase loan. As a result, the investors defaulted in January of this year, and Stuy Town is set to remain a rent-stabilized enclave until at least 2017, when it will finally be deregulated. Not quickly enough for Met life, though.

All in all, Peter Cooper Village and Stuyvesant Town are an enormous collection of red brick apartment towers that stretch from First Avenue to Avenue C, and cover the area between 14th and 23rd Streets. They are, and they look very much like housing projects, with about 56 residential buildings total. There are about 25,000 residents total, and the towers have their own “peace officers” who police the area.
Pros
  • quiet
  • secluded from the city noise
  • spacious apartments
Cons
  • ugly
  • really ugly
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
2yrs+

"This place takes a lot of heat"

Stuy Town has been under a lot of scrutiny lately, and I understand why, but what the man is doing over there doesn't really surprise me . . . especially for Manhattan. When I first moved to New York, I looked at an apartment in Stuy Town and I have a number of friends who live there. The neighborhood is not so great. There's a Starbucks, a Blockbuster, a Duane Reade and a McDonalds. That's, seriously, the neighborhood. The rest is just street and it's kind of desolate. But, I can see the appeal of living there, nonetheless. The immediate neighborhood is nothing to sing about but it is in downtown Manhattan so everything is really close and attainable. And, the apartments in Stuy Town / Peter Cooper Village are huge. I don't mean NY huge. They are enormous. They are completely re-done so there isn't a scratch on the wood, a scoff on the stainless steel appliances, a crack in the grout. And, the buildings are really secure. They are really quite nice and the price point isn't that high considering how big and new the spaces are. I know people who live in much smaller apartments for almost twice what the rent is at Stuy Town. And, the apartments accept pets (which is rare), they have concerts in the Stuy Town parks (they have their own parks) and there is concierge, a private gym, and lounges with Wifi. It's really a pretty cush deal even if you aren't one of the lucky few who managed to get a unit before the overhaul. But, I think those rent - controlled lucky ducks are meeting their end -- hence, all the flack that Stuy Town is taking. They're pushing the rent controlled out to redo their apartments and bump the rent up. Again, I don't know why anyone is surprised about this.
Pros
  • quiet
  • secluded from the city noise
  • spacious apartments
Cons
  • Scary at night
  • really ugly
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
2yrs+

"Warbly times for residents here"

If you have an apartment in this middle income housing development, you were doing something right at one point. Nowadays, though residents here are dealing with a lot of changes, and things are looking pretty confusing for them at the moment.

The housing projects were recently sold to real estate mogul Tishman Speyer, and attempts are being made at selling remodeled apartments as "luxury" condos. Currently the Tenants Association find themselves at odds with Tishman Speyer, and many likely face a long legal battle so as not to be driven from their own apartments.

If you completely ignore this conflict, this happens to be a nice neighborhood, close to the relatively quite Gramercy Park and the bustling East Village, there is something for both elderly residents and their fun loving visiting grandchildren.
Pros
  • affordable apartments
Cons
  • once affordable apartments made into luxury condos

Unranked Streets in Stuyvesant Town

"The crowded loop"
40.7298597189688 -73.9778547351354

1 Ave

2.5/5
"Huge apartments in a weird area"
40.7346139322145 -73.9801280065923

East 15 St

2.5/5
"Not the most exciting street in the city. "
40.7291641467805 -73.9752381677758

East 16 St

2.5/5
"Not a lot of street with not a lot on it."
40.7297931389571 -73.9747791696222

East 20th St

2.5/5
"Apartments"
40.7341207856843 -73.9779142570681

East 23 St

2.5/5
"The place to be for big apartment complexes"
40.7364064626339 -73.9774843099048

F D R Dr

1.5/5
"Really busy street with little to offer"
40.7327366925867 -73.9745093983304

All data is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed accurate by the RLS or Douglas Elliman. See Terms of Service for additional restrictions.

All information regarding a property for sale, rental, taxes or financing is from sources deemed reliable. No representation is made as to the accuracy thereof, and such information is subject to errors, omission, change of price, rental, commission, prior sale, lease or financing, or withdrawal without notice. All square footage and dimensions are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of a professional architect or engineer.

The number of bedrooms listed above is not a legal conclusion. Each person should consult with his/her own attorney, architect or zoning expert to make a determination as to the number of rooms in the unit that may be legally used as a bedroom.

© 2014. Douglas Elliman Real Estate. All material presented herein is intended for information purposes only. While, this information is believed to be correct, it is represented subject to errors, omissions, changes or withdrawal without notice. All property information, including, but not limited to square footage, room count, number of bedrooms and the school district in property listings are deemed reliable, but should be verified by your own attorney, architect or zoning expert. Equal Housing Opportunity.