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800.ELLIMAN

6.9 out of 10

NoHo

Ranked 20th best neighborhood in Manhattan
40.7281201649698 -73.992845291361
Great for
  • Public Transport
  • Resale or Rental Value
  • Shopping Options
  • Eating Out
  • Internet Access
Not great for
  • Cost of Living
  • Parking
  • Lack of Traffic
  • Peace & Quiet
  •  
Who lives here?
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
  •  
  •  
  •  

Reviews

4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
2yrs+

"Noho is a fantastic place to live in the thick of Manhattan"

Noho is a great neighborhood to live in downtown Manhattan that is just north of the very touristy Soho. The name Noho stands for North of Houston (as does Soho which is South of Houston), as Houston St is the southern street that borders Noho. There are a lot of NYU students living in Noho but don't let that turn you off, it really is one of the perfect areas to live as it has great access to subways, is very close to the East Village and Soho, and there are some great restaurants in the area.

The only downside I can think of is that it can be quite a noisy neighborhood, especially if you live right on Broadway. But it's NYC, most of the areas are noisy.

Highly recommended.
Pros
  • central location
  • close to major transport
  • Chic, stylish and very New York
  • excellent restaurants
  • great bar scene
Cons
  • Expensive to buy and rent because it is so desirable
  • Crowded
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
2yrs+

"NoHo – A Real Neighborhood Feeling"

New Yorkers just love coming up with shortened nicknames for their neighborhoods, and it was only a matter of time before SoHo (the hipster area South of Houston Street) spawned an uptown neighbor called NoHo (the hipster area North of Houston). It is a stylish, inviting area that runs north from Houston Street to East 9th Street, and west to east from Mercer Street to the Bowery.

NoHo is incredibly inviting and friendly. Unlike other neighborhoods in Manhattan, it has lots of welcoming benches and public spaces where residents and visitors can sit and enjoy their surroundings. There’s a lot to enjoy! Businesses include trendy clothing boutiques, home furnishing stores, antique shops, and (of course) an appropriate number of bars and eateries.

Nearby subways make NoHo extremely accessible. The N and R trains stop at Eighth Street and get you to midtown in about 15 minutes. You can catch the B, D, F and M trains at Broadway-Lafayette station and make a connection to the downtown No. 6 train. There is a cross-town bus on 8th Street.

NoHo was hit hard by the real estate meltdown and property values took quite a hit. The neighborhood remains pricey, however: the cost of a studio averages $299,000 while a floor-through in a post-war co-op with four fireplaces and a balcony is being sold for $19.5 million. Rental prices are comparable to other upscale Manhattan neighborhoods with studios renting at around $3,000 and one-bedrooms at about $4,000.

What makes NoHo truly special is what you don’t find here: no big box stores, chain restaurants, or multiplexes. NoHo has been designated a historic district by the Landmarks Preservation Society, so you can be sure that this neighborhood won’t be changing any time soon. And while there are plenty of high-rises in NoHo, most buildings are under 5 stories, and you can depend on area residents to fight to keep it that way.
Pros
  • central location
  • close to major transport
  • Chic, stylish and very New York
  • excellent restaurants
  • great bar scene
Cons
  • Expensive to buy and rent because it is so desirable
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
2yrs+

"NoHo: Centrally Located Posh Area for Those Who Can Afford It"

NoHo is a centrally located neighborhood in Manhattan which begins at Houston Street and runs North to 14th Street. It's only a few blocks wide but is comprised mostly of really expensive loft apartment buildings. It's a very artsy, ritsy area which can be enjoyed for what it is -- a great place to stroll, but for the average person it is a not so great place to shop. Prices are just way over the average person's head. The area is as Green as you can get. New businesses in this area really strive to be Green and to meet the expectation of their residents which are mostly professionals who have been working hard all their lives and have stored up quite a bit of savings. They can afford to spend the extra money on Green materials and they like to see it in the businesses they patronize such as yoga studios and the like.

Great places to eat at are Great Jones and Il Bucco. It's a great place to stroll through in the summer. Each part of Manhattan has its own personality and NoHo is of no exception.

Transportation is great here so if you are lucky enough to find digs here you will find it easy to get around. The area is very well maintained and you will feel safe and at ease when walking around here at night. Just be careful when venturing outside this particular area. NoHo offers tourists a respite from the craziness of uptown so if you need a break from the hustle and bustle spend a day here and rejuvenate.
Pros
  • Chic, stylish and very New York
  • excellent restaurants
Cons
  • Expensive to buy and rent because it is so desirable
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
2yrs+

"Nice neighborhood bordering SoHo, East Village, and Greenwich Village"

NoHo stands for north of Houston Street (just like SoHo stands for south of Houston Street). It's a neighborhood in southern Manhattan that runs up to Astor Place (8th Street) and west to east from Broadway to the Bowery. More or less, it's between Greenwich Village and the East Village. Like SoHo, it's filled with lofts, so apartments here are very much in demand. Good luck if you snag one (especially if you can actually afford it!)

This area used to be a bit seedy, but that hasn't been the case for a long time. It's a very nice area now, although I still prefer SoHo, even if SoHo is a bit more hoity-toity. For years, I considered this area to be part of SoHo, and I don't think I was alone. Suddenly, people started calling it NoHo. Joseph Papp's Public Theater is in this neighborhood, as well as the Astor Place Theater, where Blue Man Group has been running for years. These theaters are on the lovely stretch of Lafayette Street south of Astor Place (which has a great deal of history, by the way, and is named after John Jacob Astor.)

I'd love to live in this area, but I don't have delusions of being able to afford it, even if a loft became available. If you have the bucks, though, go for it! It's a great place to live, filled with students, professionals, and people in the arts. And it's right next door to SoHo, Nolita, the East Village, and Greenwich Village.
Pros
  • central location
  • close to major transport
  • great bar scene
  • Chic, stylish and very New York
  • excellent restaurants
Cons
  • Expensive to buy and rent because it is so desirable
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
2yrs+

"NoHo? No, no, no..."

NoHo (are we really calling it that? Isn't this just Astor Place?) isn't really a neighborhood. The Upper West Side is a neighborhood. Gramercy is a neighborhood. NoHo is an area with an invented name, full of nomadic students and city drifters.

Not that it's a bad place. The Public Theatre is here and the architecture is pretty awesome. Huge loft apartments are common and Matt Damon lives here (well hidden, mind you). It's also home to much of NYU's sprawl...dominating the area in both buildings and students and, well, wannabe students.

What's so bad about having one of the best colleges in the country in your backyard? You'd think this might be a benefit...with more educational opportunities, performances, academic achievement...you might think this. But NYU is a private University and non-students have ZERO access to any NYU resources. Security is tight.

I imagine this area would be more fun if I were an NYU student, but to the non-student NoHo is mostly a series of closed doors.

In closing, I also encourage you NOT to eat here. A soup and sandwich will cost you an arm and a leg. No standout eating in this area...no matter what their exteriors make you think.
Pros
  • central location
Cons
  • Crowded
  • lacking in personality
Recommended for
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
2yrs+

"Noho is really a neighborhood! ...I think."

Unlike many people, I'll admit that Noho exists - well, barely. It's not exactly a huge slice of Manhattan, but it seems legitimate enough. This used to be one of my favorite areas of the city when I was in my early twenties. Astor Place is charming enough, and this piece of Broadway is home to the Strand - possibly the world's greatest used book store.

The surrounding area is much prettier than Noho - the East Village has some lovely buildings, but the area around Cooper Square isn't nearly as attractive. The new Cooper Union building is, um, interesting, and I would recommend taking a peak at it - no matter how out of it actually seems when taken in with the surrounding architecture. (I must admit to being a fan of the old building - it's much more classic and visually appealing than the new residence, which is full of curves, sharp angles, steel and glass.)

The one thing that keeps me coming back to Noho is Astor Wines & Spirits - truly a great New York City staple, and they offer some of the best tastings I've ever taken in for free.
Pros
  • decent bar scene
  • central location
  • close to major transport
Cons
  • Crowded
  • Expensive to buy and rent because it is so desirable
  • lacking in personality
Recommended for
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
2yrs+

"Incredible location"

NoHo (North of Houston) is the counterpart of SoHo (South of Houston). It is wedged between Greenwich Village and the East Village. It is also a relatively new neighborhood in terms of Manhattan
nomenclature, since it was named only as recently as 1999. However, it contains many historic turn of the century houses and office buildings. Among the most beautiful and notable are the Public Theater on Lafayette Street, and a part of the Collonade Row which is just across the street from it. Also right nearby is the new Cooper Union building, a really interesting piece of architecture, though you can't see all the great design details inside the building unless you're a student. Many of the residential options in this area are loft style apartment buildings, so the real estate here is quite expensive. In addition, it is incredibly central, with Astor Place being a hub of traffic of sorts. A lot of the best eating and bar options in the area are actually more in the neighboring East Village or Greenwich Village, but you just can't beat this neighborhood for its central location.
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
2yrs+

"Not convinced that it stands as a neighborhood alone, but it's cool"

Noho is the area above Soho that sort of melts in Greenwich. It's basically where a lot of NYU is, and because of that, has a lot of students in it. But, it doesn't have the inundated with student antics vibe quite like Greenwich does, so it's a little more pretentious / clean.
Noho is packed pretty densely with restaurants, bars and cafes as well as little shops. The most notable area, to me, of Noho is Astor Place. There is the infamous Astor Starbucks: it's huge, it smells funny, it's packed and I'm pretty sure it's the porthole to crazytown. I have actually seen a person shaving another person's back in the Starbucks and, apparently, it wasn' the first time something like this has happened.
The Astor Kmart area is really heavily trafficked with corporate youngsters running to pick up a sandwich, people hanging outside of the Public Theatre and a whole bunch of certifiably crazy people talking to themselves on any given corner. Basically, it's a great place to people watch; there's every kind of life form hustling around this area.
The restaurants aren't award winning because of the college factor and I wouldn't entirely describe it a neighborhood because it's just too urban and bustly, but it's an avoidable place. And, it's not unpleasant.
Pros
  • central location
  • Chic, stylish and very New York
  • close to major transport
  • everyone dressed so well
  • excellent restaurants
  • great bar scene
Cons
  • Crowded
  • expensive
  • Expensive to buy and rent because it is so desirable
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
2yrs+

"Well, there's Astor Place"

Noho exists and I know because I saw a sign hanging over Broadway, somewhere below 14th Street, that said, “Welcome to Noho.” That bit of affirmation notwithstanding, I am suspicious of this area really having congealed into a place that has an atmosphere and style unique from the neighborhoods that surround it. The name feels a lot like a real estate invention than a true neighborhood, and I find it an area rather hard to quantify. Purists might just argue this used to be the divisor between Greenwich Village and the East Village, and why do we need to give it a special name? Just because the NYU kids have taken it over? One of its odd distinctions in my book is that it is an area much, much better suited to shopping at the major clothing stores than Soho is, especially on weekends. Why is that? Because every one of the stores that line Broadway in Soho, like Gap and Banana Republic, is replicated on the stretch of Broadway that runs up to 14th Street. And because you're not in Soho, there are just fewer crowds, and you can actually shop in peace, even on weekends. Another odd feature of Noho is that its center is at Astor Place, a place I would only experience while passing through on my way elsewhere, and hardly a destination of its own. I do love the gorgeous building that houses the Public Theater and the huge spaciousness of the lofts on Great Jones Street.
Pros
  • central location
  • close to major transport
  • great bar scene
Cons
  • overrun with drunk students
  • lacking in personality
  • Crowded
Recommended for
  • Tourists
3/5
2yrs+

"Fantastic artistic neighborhood that's only a little pretentious..."

SoHo's younger sister, NoHo - North of Houston Street - may not have quite the cachet of SoHo itself, but this downtown enclave of lofts and galleries is nevertheless up there when it comes to fashionable downtown neighborhoods. As effectively the "center" of downtown Manhattan, with easy access to the East and West Villages, Bowery, SoHo, Tribeca, and more, it can command high process, and its historic nineteenth and early-twentieth century houses, meticulously preserved by the NYC Landmarks Preservation Committee, only drive the cost per square foot up further.

NoHo has an artsy reputation; while its lofts might sell for millions today, they're more likely to go to wealthy graphic designers than to investment bankers. Cultural highlights in the area include the fantastic Angelika Film Centre, one of the best art house theatres in the city (with an excellent cafe to boot!), the Astor Place Theatre for stage finds, the Joseph Papp Public Theatre, and popular bookstores Mercer Street Books and Shakespeare and Company, both of whom cater to a more literary crowd than your average chains.
Uraniumfish
Uraniumfish What lofts and galleries do you mean? As far as I know the area it's not a big gallery place nor is it typically loft-filled. Condos and co-ops are rather the typical residences here,
2yrs+
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3/5
2yrs+

"Artists, bookstores, and vintage tees"

NoHo is a quiet and small neighborhood that assists SoHo in sandwiching in Greenwich Village. NoHo is a lot different in regards to tranquility than its southern neighbor, despite its closeness to New York University (NYU).

NoHo used to be nothing but farmland, but now is a fashionable and hip commodity in Manhattan. The neighborhood is also home to many historic and early nineteenth century architecture, including Colonnade Row, the Cable Building, Joseph Papp Public Theater, and Merchant’s House Museum (a home dating back to the 1800s).

Retail stores can be located on Broadway, where you will find the local favorite Andy’s Chee-Pees. Andy’s features the largest selection of vintage tees and punk leather jackets in NYC. Here you will never spend too much money and always leave happy!

NoHo offers many residential lofts that have become quite popular among local artists and writers. As a result, the neighborhood boasts many bookstores like Shakespeare & Co. and Mercer Street Books. Several theaters are spread throughout the area too, like Angelika Film Center located on Houston and Mercer.

Every August, NoHo partakes in Summer Streets, where major city streets are turned into pedestrian walkways. NoHo is getting more and more “green” with every passing year.
3/5
2yrs+

"In-between tourist hot spots"

This is a pretty cool neighborhood – it basically picks up the shopping where SoHo leaves off (though the shops up here may be leaning a bit more to the NYU crowd and a bit less toward the more affluent SoHo sect). Lafayette Street in NoHo was once one of the most fashionable streets in town, though it’s pretty hard to tell now. There is a Crunch on this street, though, where I used to haul my athletic shoes after work – they have an awesome facility, though I don’t know if I would pay those prices again before checking out other gyms in the area.

Unranked Streets in NoHo

"Old and New"
40.7268400036714 -73.9927169937587

Stable Ct

1/5
"A Driveway . . .seriously"
40.727812547936 -73.9919259817666

Broadway

2.5/5
"Very commercial but really cool buildings"
40.7303302357642 -73.9926294479527

Cooper Sq

2.5/5
"Street built for a school"
40.7291440997987 -73.9909263362157

East 10 St

2.5/5
"Grace Church and a lot of traffic"
40.7314966128567 -73.9908853853081

East 11 St

2.5/5
"Not bad but not fantastic either"
40.7324463970578 -73.9912843918734

East 12 St

2.5/5
"Not charming or fun but not horrible"
40.7329642626904 -73.9905214828617

East 4 St

2.5/5
"Cool little chunk of East 4th"
40.7278789546514 -73.9931690290962

East 8 St

2.5/5
"A lot going on and a lot of crazies"
40.7303674872297 -73.9918623278532

East 9 St

1.5/5
"Not enough of anything for the price"
40.7308404460648 -73.9911554059032

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